Welcome.

The goal of this project is understanding.  We all have our own view of America and it deserves to be heard.

A Marylander

A Marylander

Politics aren’t important until they start echoing the sentiments of our collective mutual feelings. My name is Jace The Caveat, I’m a musician, a recovering conservative, and active Green Party supporter. Having supported Jill Stein in 2012, against the policies of Obama, I was not surprised to have two candidates in this election that seemingly no one wanted, for which the entire electorate seemed to settle.

I grew up poor in Suitland, MD, which is part of the most affluent county in the United States, with a majority African-American population. However, my upbringing was very conservative, due to my parent’s southern roots, and their emphasis on excellence and American Exceptionalism. The politics I was taught to parrot were right-wing as well, until my eventual coming-out. First, as bisexual; second, as an agnostic theist; and third, as a supporter of #BlackLivesMatter & pan-African causes.

As far as I can observe, the lilt of the American lexicon favors those who speak in terms of capitalism, economic change, and individualism. Discussion of systematic oppression, or generic identification of a problem is quickly swatted in lieu of a solution that doesn't require the modification of hearts and minds. Mainstream America, much like the people who voted for Donald Trump and Hilary Clinton, are satisfied to ignore socio-economic issues unless they exist in their present-day struggle.

#BLM did not receive attention until the movement began spurring adjoining support from celebrities like Colin Kaepernick, and people had to acknowledge the impromptu traffic jams in their cities from the civil disobedience. In my opinion, if we had engaged each other about the issues of race relations, and the socio-economic divide, we would have been better poised to handle the outcome of the election, and each other. At least if we were honest with each other, if everyone is a "little bit racist", let's figure out why a little bit has suddenly become a lot. I surmise that this is more prevalent on both sides of the aisle, and is probably why a lot of guys who were quick to say #ImWithHer, still make jokes about me being black, when we're in the gay bars on the weekends.

In the wake of the election of Donald Trump, I remained calm, and implored my friends to do the same. Although I do feel endangered due to the uptick in social incidents against protected classes, I believe in the Law of Attraction. So, collectively, as a nation, we requested and received the leader we deserved. A few of my gay friends who were #WithHer have since been a little miffed at me, because of my ambivalence.

As a member of the electorate, my calm has come from years and decades of experiencing less than the American Dream due to my skin color, sexual orientation, and the intersection of both. It's not bad enough that we elected a president who was openly racist, misogynist, and seemingly allergic to the truth...the real travesty here is that the american public made concessions for TWO candidates who did the same, all in the name of Democracy. If a vote is an affirmative representation to select the future of America, why did we spend so much time explaining away their pasts?

A New Yorker

A New Yorker

A Pennsylvanian

A Pennsylvanian